SIDEBAR Update in the Lovelace Case: The Jury Was Spilt Down the Middle

sidebar2

 

Don O’Brien has just spoken with  Curtis Lovelace’s legal team. According to his lead attorney,  James Elmore. According to O’Brien’s tweets, the jury was spilt with six voting guilty and six voting not guilty.  Elmore was not surprised by the hung jury as his read on the jury was that they were not a cohesive group. The jury was not officially polled, because no verdict was reached. The foreman told the judge the split and the Judge told the attorneys.

I was also informed by a local source that the bail for Curtis was initially set at FIVE MILLION DOLLARS.  Which is very excessive and meant to keep him imprisoned as I doubt you would need more than one hand to find people in Quincy with that sort of access to cash.

In other news, it was previously told to me that Curtis was indeed out of money and would be unable to afford to pay for representation on his second trial. Elmore, confirmed to O’Brien today that he and co-counsel Jeff Page would no longer be representing Curtis. It is likely that Curtis will need to be assigned a public defender. There is a rumor about town that he will be representing himself. I find that highly unlikely. He did not even push to testify in his first trial. Most people who are foolish enough to represent themselves, also are foolish enough to testify against the advice of legal counsel.

court

It seems to be that the prosecution is willing to spare no expense to retry Curtis Lovelace while at the same time bankrupting him. I wonder if there are donations being taken from the constituency who thinks he is not guilty?  I’ve spoken with several people from Quincy who seem convinced he is guilty. But muchlike  the jury there is a definite split among those I’ve spoken with.  The prevailing attitude seems to be that the locals just want a resolution and to move on.  It doesn’t appear that this will be resolved quickly. The new attorney, if there is one will have less than four months to prepare a first degree murder defense.  That’s a difficult task, especially if you are a public defender who has never tried a murder case with a judge who probably hasn’t presided over that many.

You can read Don O’Brien’s exclusive report based on his conversations with Elmore, on Whig News by clicking this link.  You can also follow Don O’Brien on Twitter for up to the minute reporting on this case.

Please read the commenting rules before commenting. It’s rough crowd around here. Don’t get in the water if you can’t swim. :)

58 Comments

Filed under News, Sidebar

58 responses to “SIDEBAR Update in the Lovelace Case: The Jury Was Spilt Down the Middle

  1. Spilledperfume

    I’m interested in seeing how everything plays out.

    • His new attorney will probably ask for the trial date to be moved to August or September and a change of venue. I wonder if it’s possible for Lovelace’s previous attorneys to be court-appointed to represent him, or if Lovelace would want that. Speaking of a “rough crowd,” where’s TeeCee? I miss her calling us names and telling us how hopelessly stupid we are. ☹️

      • tamaratattles

        In order to get a change of venue they will have to go with the stance that pre-trial publicity has negatively impacted his ability to have a fair trial. They filed a pre=trial motion for change of venue in the first trial and it was denied. I think if I were the public defender I’d look for a reason for the judge to recuse himself. I think his publicizing the juror spilt could be used for grounds. I am sure the new lawyer will file a second time for a change of venue ahead of the second trial. The juror that gave an interview will come into play for that. That said, the chance of a COV seems miniscule as we are looking at a prosecution with the full force of the county behind him as evidenced by the FIVE MILLION DOLLAR BAIL.

        As for his old attorneys being public defenders, the reason they are quitting is because he can’t pay. Public attorneys are paid by the county and are on a list of public attorneys. Elmore and Page are both from Springfield, over 100 miles from Quincy. Public defenders would include local Quincy attorneys on file with the public defenders office. Having yet another Quincy person in the mix will also muddy the waters. There is too much “community” in this county. Not that it is a bad thing, in general, but in a murder trial when all the attorneys and judges know each other, it’s another good reason for a CHANGE OF FUCKING VENUE. But the people who have to grant that motion are also “insiders”. It’s a catch 22. Even more importantly, the jury pool all knows each other. As JustAGuy pointed out, they may not want to be responsible for putting the father of community children in jail, or be responsible for setting him free to potentially kill “again” if they think he probably did it. There is already an element of fear in the community about Curtis eventually being released.

  2. Tara

    Ok, I know I am not the sharpest tool in the shed, Hell I am not even in the shed. My question, what actual evidence do they have against the defendant?
    I know his actions make him look guilty, can he be convicted because of that?
    Thank you TT
    “Don’t get in the water if you can’t swim” love it!!!

    • tamaratattles

      I can’t speak for the jurors, but the people here ready to convict are hanging their opinion on the fact that Cory’s hands were in an unusual position during rigor mortis. The prosecution managed to convince them that the only plausible explanation is that she was being suffocated by a pillow which was not removed until she was rigid. They also don’t believe the children’s statements two days after the death that they saw their mother before heading off to school for their Valentines Day parties and believe that the conversation on that morning could have happened on a previous day. Comfortable in those beliefs married with Curtis’s oddball behavior after the death is in their minds “beyond a reasonable doubt.” And enough for them to convict.

      The other side is not entirely convinced that a murder did in fact occur. And even if they find it more likely than not that a murder did occur, they are not convinced that there is evidence, beyond a reasonable doubt that Curtis is a killer. They may find it more likely than not that Curtis committed the murder, but they are making their decision based on the legal standard of “beyond a reasonable doubt.”

      So six jurors had reasonable doubt. Next time, the prosecution will continue to throw money at this case and hope it pays off. While the defense may or may not have a new lawyer who has never tried a first degree murder case.

      That’s where we are.

      • Matzah60

        What I don’t understand is why they waited 9 years to charge Curtis. What seemed to be lacking is any real physical evidence save the scar or cut on her bottom lip. The theory which is only a theory that her hands were in an odd position which would only result from being suffocated. Can a coroner determine how long it took for rigor mortis to set in when an examination is done on the body at the scene of the crime/death.

        It seems that in questioning on the day of Cory’s death, it was stated that all the children, save the child sleeping upstairs with the mother, all stated that not only did they see their mother before leaving for school, but that their mother actually managed to get downstairs to the bottom of the steps. She sat there to say goodbye to the kids. I know that the oldest daughter has recanted that story and is now living with her maternal grandparents (I believe). I think that one child now says they don’t remember if they spoke to their mother.

        One last question, TT. What percentage of the 5 f…ing million dollars would he have to pay to get out on bail. I truly have never heard of a bail set that high. I don’t really what OJ’s bail was. Realizing that was back in 1994, I still can’t believe in relative terms that it compared to this bail in this case where six jurors came to the conclusion that there was reasonable doubt

      • Matzah60

        Excellent @Soul Shine. It sounds like Barney was the lead Detective from Mayberry was in charge of this case. I live in a small town similar to Quincy. There is one small town after another and each town has between a 2 to 3 miles radius. There is a different Judge for each of these towns. There are approximately 10 tiny towns that come under the umbrella of Atlantic County.

        Before Caller ID when I was getting divorced, my ex’s paramour would call (I was convinced) between 30 to 40 times a day. My ex said I was psychotic (maybe, but not because of the phone calls) and I was ‘imagining’ the phone calls and asked the family judge to place me in a psych ward. All true. You can’t make up stuff life this. By the time my ex was about to move out of the house, *69 came to life ending all anonymous calls. My gut was right and I filed a complaint again this woman. She was literally driving me out of my mind. The judge in our town wouldn’t hear it because he knew Joe (sometime ‘expert’ witness in personal injury cases), myself, or both of us and claimed conflict of interest. WHICH leads me to why this guy Curtis (as you discussed above, Tamara, can’t get a goddamn change of venue.

        During the OJ trial, had it not been for the change of venue, it seems certain that OJ would have been found guilty and probably have served a good part of his sentence by now. Many felt that Marcia Clark and Harden’s insistence on a change of venue was paramount in an acquittal. Why can’t they public defender in this case make a request to the State govt for a special impartial prosecutor and Judge? This would make more sense as it seems a second trial will probably result in a similar verdict.

  3. Tara

    I could not convict someone with this evidence, I don’t even understand how it got to trial. Yes, I think he probably did it but we can not convict on probably.

    Yes the position of her arms and hands are odd but I still don’t understand how he could have suffocated her with a pillow. Could she not turn her head to get air? Where is the pillow? Is there one missing? I know I have already asked these questions, but it just doesn’t make sense. There would have been something (busted blood vessels?) to support this. I mean support beyond a reasonable doubt.

  4. Justa Guy

    It seems the same as “most thought he was guilty”. Six thought it was beyond reasonable doubt, is how I read this 6-6 thing. Three or four thought probably but not beyond reasonable doubt. Two or three thought not guilty, or maybe guilty but where is the proof?

    The lies to police over her death is a pretty big deal, as well as no other cause of death in the time frame they claimed. Can they do a better job and convince 100% instead of 50%? Dwelling more on his character maybe, or a more distant jury, and better presentation second time around. The defense demands the smoking gun, and juries will tend to have at least someone that agrees.

    I guess we wait till summer to find out.

  5. Justa Guy

    “I can’t speak for the jurors, but the people here ready to convict are hanging their opinion on the fact that Cory’s hands were in an unusual position during rigor mortis.”

    Well you can’t speak for the people here either. I am “ready to convict” since there is no consequence to my readiness. Six jurors that saw ALL evidence were ready in real life, and I respect their judgement as much as the unsure six.

    It is not just the arm position (not just “unusual”, but suspended by a missing object, even defense admitted that) that commenters are using. It is the timing of the rigor being way off from the alibi, along with the apparent lies to police, to cover up. Then there is all the background of his character and problems, and the daughter that is estranged, and Cory’s mother kept away from her grandkids. ALL those things build the case with many facts, around the “smoking gun” of arms being held up by something obviously removed, and lies that didn’t fit the impossible “early rigor”. The kid thought she had a broken arm?

    • Tara

      @Justa Guy

      I am in no way trying to be my usual bitchy self (oh I am normally, ask my Secretary:) but could you send this man away for the rest of his life? I think he probably did it, but I couldn’t vote guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

      • Soul Shine Karma

        Thanks for providing a venue for discussion on this intriguing case, Tamara.

        I have been following this as best I can from afar (on East Coast) thanks mostly to updates from The Whig’s Don O’Brien. So, I have limited info on which to write or understand the complexities but when trying to digest the details, I do keep getting hung up on how they decided to try the case in the first place. It would have been amazing to have heard how they came to the decision:

        Attorney 1: “Ok, what do we have? ”

        Detective A: “We talked to the neighbors, they said the marriage was on the rocks.”

        Attorney 1: “Ok, that could be applied to about 55% of all marriages…you said they had 4 kids? Make that 75%. That’s all you have from the neighbors?”

        Detective A: “Not at all – we got a slam dunk here: this guy walking his dog saw a light on and movement of a large person”

        Attorney 1: “Great! Was the large person holding a pillow down over someone’s head?”

        Detective A: “No – he said the figure was pacing”

        Attorney 1: (note to self: don’t become a murder suspect when getting up to walk off that charlie horse you always get after sleeping) Detective B, Why wasn’t the ‘detail’ of this eyewitness included in the first investigation?”

        Detective B: “This person didn’t come forward until after Lovelace was arrested”

        Attorney 1: “Ok…so for witnesses, let me recap: we have a rocky marriage and, 10 years later, a passerby remembers there was a light on in the house with someone moving around….not too solid but tell me about the science? I mean, we are going to ruin a person’s life and tear families apart with this arrest, surely we have something irrefutable science? ”

        Detective A: “YES!! Of course we do!”

        Attorney 1: “Great! Tell me more! So, you took this to an expert forensic pathologist and they said there is a clear case for suffocation”

        Detective A: “Yes!…well….no…not the first expert I took it to but the second expert, the second expert definitely agreed with my leading questions that it was suffocation”

        Attorney 1: “Ummmm…I don’t know if that is enough to convict someone, beyond a reasonable doubt…what did the first responders and the coroner say?”

        Detective B: “Coroner couldn’t determine cause of death…first responders said her stomach was warm to the touch and thought she had died within past few hours…at the time, they said it could have been due to a number of reasons, one of which being that the victim was in poor health (from alcohol abuse and bulimia) ”

        Detective A: “He acted really weird after his wife died!”

        Attorney 1: “Is there a normal way to act after your wife dies in your bed?”

        Detective A: “He didn’t cry at all!”

        Attorney walks out of room, looks for someone else to try the case.

      • tamaratattles

        Great post. That’s what I am seeing from afar too. Either there is more we don’t know about this case, or emotions are running very high in Quincy. You forgot the “funny hands.”

      • amisteree

        Soul Shine, your recap was perfection. Thanks.

      • amisteree

        @Soul Shine Karma: are you a screenwriter? : ))

      • Soul Shine Karma

        TT-
        Yes! I was trying to focus on what *new* evidence was uncovered to re-open the case. “Funny hands” were there in both investigations. To me, the math of the scientific evidence looks like this:

        (expert forensics consultation not at scene)
        vs
        (expert forensics consultation not at scene + multiple eyewitnesses at the scene)

        The two expert forensics consultations cancel each other out (with their theories on time and cause of death) and we are left with what the first responders, police/investigators, coroners saw when they arrived.

        @USMC
        I think that is a good question – how do we know the wife’s health was bad? Well, the death was undetermined for 8 years. In that time, no one in the deceased’s family came forward to say “Hey- what’s the deal?”? No one even suspected Lovelace or foul play? They were told alcoholism and bulimia were probably why she died (from the initial investigation’s reporting)..they were told she had been ill and her body just gave up and they thought “Yeah…I guess that is plausible”? So, apparently, they all knew she was in poor health or they would have contested it more. It is very sad, so I don’t mean to make light of it but I know I would have pushed like hell to have found a better reason for death if that were my relation or friend and I knew they were healthy…it doesn’t mean she definitely died from alcoholism and bulimia though, does it? It is just more plausible than another other cause as far as I can see, at this point…

        I still cannot seem to figure out why the case was re-opened but I also cannot explain why Lovelace acts so oddly emotionless (after the death, after the arrest and during the trial)…something feels off but I don’t think we know what it is (and neither investigation has yet to uncover it). He could be a broken man (alcoholic, never recovered from glory days of college) or an automaton (to many football helmets to the brain) or he is a guilty sociopath…(2 out of 3 ain’t bad?)…or there is something we don’t know about yet. Who does know? The second wife? Whatever it is, something seems off with his reactions…but that doesn’t make him a murderer. Our society has laws which state it is better to err on a guilty man going free than lock up an innocent man for a crime he didn’t commit. I sincerely hope justice is served here. I just don’t yet see the evidence to get there.

      • Smallishtowngirl

        Spul shine karma, many of here in Quincy are seeing the same thing as well.
        Obviously some are not.

    • Time of death coupled with her arm position is what really does it for me. Sealing the deal are his bizarre demeanour and actions after her death.

    • RL

      If you think the jury saw “all” the evidence, I can almost assure you they did not. Lots and LOTS of evidence is ruled inadmissible way before trials even start, even if some of it would 100 percent give people reasonable doubt. What the jurors see is what the judge and prosecutors want them to see, and no one will ever see the other stuff unless the defense attorney has a damn good reason to object (and most of the time those objections are overruled) and may only come to light with an retrial/overturn of a conviction/appeal and a judge that rules whatever was kept out admissible this time around.

  6. usmc

    Im curious when did curt talk about Cory heath issues with EMT, Police etc.. Is there proof that she actually had everything curt suggested…

  7. LoveMyBB

    Would love to follow this case, but thanks to TT’s riveting coverage of Jodi Arias trial (that I recently found in TT archives), I am totally engrossed in viewing the entire trial. I am up to cross exam of her on day 22 and she is a piece of work. She is losing it for herself. Thinks she is playing the jury with her attitude to the prosecutor, but is actually showing she is no one’s victim even though portraying her as the victim was her defense. Not smart. At least that’s my take so far.

    My obsession with this case is all TT’s fault!!!

    • TT’s trial coverage is riveting. Want to feed your obsession? Search “Jodi Arias Trial” on YouTube AND read TT’s recaps. All of her testimony is YouTube without sidebars. I did that almost every day during the trial. Enjoy.

    • Ummm…I think “viewing” means that’s what you’re doing. Sorry.

      • LoveMyBB

        Yes, that’s exactly what I’m doing, hence the obsession which TT started! So glad I can keep up with all my other shows right here through the recaps since I have no time to actually watch tv. In fact, headphones in listening right now!

  8. Dancemom

    @soul shine karma and TT: love and agree with your summaries. While I have been away from Quincy for a lot of years my parents are still in town. I just don’t see a evidence for a case let alone the massive amounts of money they are paying to house and try him. I also haven’t heard much about people being afraid of him although I did see that implied in a couple of posts. Any idea where that fear is coming from?

  9. Soul Shine Karma

    TT-
    Yes! I was trying to focus on what *new* evidence was uncovered to re-open the case. “Funny hands” was evidence in both investigations. To me, the math of the scientific evidence looks like this:

    (expert forensics consultation not at scene)
    vs
    (expert forensics consultation not at scene + multiple eyewitnesses at the scene)

    The two expert forensics consultations cancel each other out (with their theories on time and cause of death) and we are left with what the first responders, police/investigators, coroners saw when they arrived.

    @USMC
    I think that is a good question – how do we know the wife’s health was bad? Well, the death was undetermined for 8 years. In that time, no one in the deceased’s family came forward to say “Hey- what’s the deal?”? No one even suspected Curt or foul play? From the initial investigation’s reporting, they were told she had been ill and her body just gave up after years of alcoholism and bulimia and they thought “Yeah…I guess that is plausible”. So, apparently, they knew she was in poor health or they would have contested it more? I know I would have pushed like hell to have found a better reason for death if that were my relation or friend who was in good health.

    I still cannot seem to figure out why the case was re-opened but I also cannot explain why Lovelace acts so oddly emotionless (after the death, after the arrest and during the trial)…something feels off but I don’t think we know what it is (and neither investigation has yet to uncover it). He could be a broken man (alcoholic, never recovered from glory days of college) or an automaton (to many football helmets to the brain) or he is guilty sociopath…(2 out of 3 ain’t bad?)…or it’s something we don’t know about yet. Who does know? The second wife? Whatever it is, something seems off with Lovelace’s reactions…but that doesn’t make him a murderer. Our society has laws which state it is better to err on a guilty man going free than an innocent man being locked up for a crime he didn’t commit. I sincerely hope justice is served here.

    • LMM

      I am a Quincy native with the majority of my family still living there. The medical examiner who performed Cory’s autopsy was forced to resign her recent position in Sangamon county (location of state capital, Springfield) due to numerous cases of incompetency. When investigators in Quincy found out that she had messed up numerous autopsies and had such a lack of credibility, they decided they needed to look into any cases of suspicious deaths whose autopsies she performed. Upon reviewing Cory’s file with more competent medical experts, they concluded the evidence pointed to homicide.

      • Dancemom

        Here’s my questions about that LMM. The first pathologist the QPD contacted was Teas who said, yeah- the autopsy wasn’t done the way I would have done it but there’s no evidence of a crime here. Why would QPD continue to co tact pathologists until finding some who thought it was a suffocation ?

      • Smallishtowngirl

        I didn’t find the original article that was on the Illinois Times but if you search Dr Jessica Bowman pathologist you will come up with quite a few articles.
        And it seems that the pathologist who took over her position and was hailed by many as wonderful became embroiled in politics in the Springfield coroners office in 2011. Tough gig and politics as usual in this state.
        The prosecutor in the Lovelace case is quoted many times about Bowman’s incompetency. Some it would seem before he was appointed. Alwyas politics in this state.
        I don’t know wether Curt is guilty or not but the case is sure muddled by inconsistencies.

  10. Queen of the Nile

    Soul Shine Karma … great posts!

  11. bravocueen

    As I get older, I have a bigger and bigger problem with re-trying someone when there is a hung jury. The state, properly motivated, could literally bankrupt someone by forcing them to defend themselves repeatedly. A state, with pretty much unlimited resources, can continue to prosecute until someone calls uncle, or runs out of money and has to use a public defender (who do not have unlimited resources). Recognizing that a hung jury is a mistrial, I understand why states can re-try someone, but I firmly believe that if they do,the state should have to match, dollar for dollar, what they pay to prosecute, to the defendant’s legal fees. There is so much corruption, that it really isn’t right.

  12. I think if the charge and trial would have happened 8 years ago, jurors could have convicted in their belief of the rigor, cut lip and hand/arm position evidence. The consciousness of guilt/”odd demeanor” actions after the death would have more circumstantial meaning. (The kids left @ school, the comment to the neighbor, the not calling 911 but the boss etc) This late in the game, it’s just not as convincing.

    The re-opening and expense (Baden etc) of this case is interesting, along with the plans to retry – another huge expense. I think there’s way more to it than we know.

    Sidebar-Sidebar: I finished up obsessing the “Gypsy Blanchard(e)” case mentioned in the other blog comments of this case. Weird and fascinating! I’ve moved on to the “Virginia Tech” murder of 13 yr old Nicole Lovell by David Eisenhauer and Natalie Keepers…looks to be some cold blooded, unexplainable shit going on with these two sociopaths.

    • RL

      I was obsessed with the Blanchard case for the first few months. They were kinda local celebrities, and to find out it was all a scam. It will get crazier but trial is a long way off

  13. Smallishtowngirl

    There are two histipatholoy slides from the autopsy. They both show fatty liver. Pathologists from both sides attest to this.
    Can have other causes, but alcoholism is a fairly common factor.

    As to the initial pathologist. Everyone seems to think that there was just a big sentence saying “I dont know how she died”. I doubt that was the case. There was a report. That report was enough for the coroners to use in the inquest. The pathologist was very lax in her duties no doubt and not at all thorough or transparent where I feel the main problem is in this case. That appears to be the M. O. and why counties stopped using her. There was an in depth article about her in either the Springfield Journal Register or the local free paper that I can’t remember the name of. Maybe I can find it online.

    • Dancemom

      @smallish I read that article too. I agree (again) with your comments.

      Do you know why QPD wasn’t satisfied with Dr. Teas (first pathologist- second investigation) said yeah- I would have done this autopsy different but there is nothing showing suffocation? But here are some potential causes of death. I am very curious why at that point they ‘shopped’ around for a pathologist that agreed with them.

      Usually you hear about the defense shopping but the prosecution shopping to prove that there is a case? It just seems odd.

  14. I think the incompetence of the initial pathologist played a larger role in this case being reopened. http://www.sj-r.com/article/20100502/NEWS/305029978/?Start=1

  15. Soul Shine Karma

    Thanks to amisteree and Queen of the Nile for the kind words.

    LMM & Dancemom, good to hear your perspective from the town.

    Tess, your assessment is spot on, to wit, why is the case re-opened?

    LMM,
    What you write is logical: The first coroner is proven to be incompetent elsewhere (as supported by sources from smallishtowngirl), so the police, being thorough, decide to take another look and uncover an undetermined death from her tenure in the town. What happens next? To Dancemom’s point, the police take the case to a forensic expert and that (unbiased) expert states there isn’t enough science/evidence to support wrongdoing/suffocation.

    Now, this is the point of my first post: where is the “smoking gun evidence”, at this point in the story?

    i.e., Why don’t the police stop here? What inspires the police to continue the investigation?

    Is it they doubt the initial coroner (who has been shown to be questionable) *and* also doubt the integrity of the second expert pathologist, so now they press for a third opinion, just to be sure?

    Maybe…I don’t know how much time the police has on their hands in this town…
    OR
    Was there “smoking gun evidence” uncovered at this point which makes the police want to ignore the first two forensic reviews and continue with the probe, seeking out yet another forensic expert?

    I would have to guess, before the police seek out a third opinion, they have something which encourages them to pursue…at this point in the timeline of the case, what is it that encourages them to feel this is a slam dunk case?

    Remember, they are going to accuse and arrest their hometown golden boy (football star, assistant state attorney, president of the SCHOOL BOARD!)? We hear the second investigation uncovered a rocky marriage, Lovelace’s problems keeping his family together and, allegedly, a light/movement in the house on the morning of Feb 14, 2006 (*more on this later).

    What are we not being told at this point in the story? What was the new “smoking gun evidence” which inspired the continued investigation? (Remember- Lovelace suspicious actions are a flag but that was known during the first investigation, as well….)

    It’s feeling very small town at this point…either at some point, post 2006, the police/someone in power has a run with Lovelace and now has an axe to grind (and encourages the investigation) OR, more plausibly, somebody isn’t telling us what exactly the “smoking gun evidence” was which made the police pursue the case…but what could that something be that it wouldn’t come out in court? Was it evidence which was subsequently found to be unsubstantiated and/or not admissible in court? So, the “smoking gun” was a hunch? Was it a confession from Wife 2 that we don’t know about? Whatever it is, it takes us back to my first point: What was the “smoking gun evidence” which made the police want to tear up a family and throw one of their own into jail?

    • Dancemom

      I always wondered if she was somehow involved in the second investigation and the desire of QPD to keep talking to pathologists until they found one who would testify to suffocation.

      Interesting thought @soul shine karma

    • As a lifelong Quincy resident, I will add another layer to this tale. Our sleepy little community has seen a dramatic increase in gang activity over the last decade or so. Recently, there has been a rash of shootings and a handful of murders. That may not be alarming in Chicago or St. Louis, but it has been an eye-opener here. In response, our Chief of Police recently went in from of the City Council, begging for additional funds to hire at least two additional officers to combat the increase in time. In doing so, Chief Copley stated that his department was significantly understaffed and his officers were working overtime in order to maintain minimum staffing levels.

      Many people have questioned why the Lovelace case was re-opened after eight years. According to Chief Copley, it was due to the hard work of one detective (Adam Gibson). As the story goes, shortly after he was promoted to detective, Gibson was given a handful of cold cases to work, Lovelace included. One might surmise that it was the high-profile nature of the accused that prompted this decision, but my question is this: If our town is suffering from such a manpower shortage in terms of officers out on the street, how in the world can we justify dedicating an officer to the task of poking around eight-year old “cold” cases?

      The evidence in this case isn’t going to change. The testimony at trial revealed that there is significant disagreement among the expert witnesses and that will be true at the re-trial, if there is one, as well. As a Quincy resident, it is my opinion that this charade has gone on long enough. It is time to pull the plug on this “investigation.”

    • Smallishtowngirl

      That is where I am at as well. What on earth was it? And why was it thrown out? This case certainly perplexes me. And the amount of money being spent is staggering when the state is broke. Of course I don’t know how the money is split on this type of thing. County vs State and all.

  16. Josie

    There is no solid evidence in this 8 year old case. No evidence of trauma by suffocation. She was an alcoholic & bullimic and was sick for days prior to her death. Any juror truly going by the evidence will not convict.

    Two days later the kids said they saw her that morning. The person on the scene said her stomach was warm. Also, what is the motive?

    My dad died unexpectedly yrs ago. I probably appeared cold but was being strong for my mom and sis. I even had to make the funeral arrangements. It was not until days later at the burial and watching them lower the casket that I lost it. Cried so hard my body shook.

    Curtis may have seemed cold because he was holding it together for the kids and he was in shock. Also, if they werent getting along, there would have been a sense of relief which would have made him feel guilty.

  17. Qcy1234

    Found this post during a google search. New today, Curtis has requested copies of transcripts from the trial…but doesn’t have the money to pay for them.

    http://www.wgem.com/story/31261136/2016/02/19/accused-murderer-curtis-lovelace-asks-for-trial-transcripts

    There is also an interview with Wive Number Three. And a 48 hours piece tomorrow.

  18. What is this, a reunion site for the Casey Anthony and OJ juries? If Curtis lied about the time of death, he’s guilty. He lied about the time of death. It absolutely is that simple. If you could seat a jury of respectable forensic pathologists or even just nonquack MDs and disinterested RNs–dermatologists even!– they’d convict the guy in five minutes.* All the defense needs to do is stack the jury with of intelligent design folks or better yet, pentecostals who tithe to the Creation Museum (where dinosaurs wear saddles), and Curtis will walk.
    The defense claims about time of death are preposterous. The only doubt here is unreasonable. . Not usually this brassy but I was taught to enter a rough crowd swinging.

    *No offense to dermatologists intended.

    • tamaratattles

      LOL we’re really not that rough. Just super opinionated. I watched 48 hours last night and was even more confused. Lindsay did not have the demeanor I expected at all. The guy doing the narrating claimed that the town was whispering from the beginning about Curtis. That is not what I was told by people who live there. They said they never questioned it. Even the mother didn’t have suspicions and to this day seems not to know what to believe. The new wife was on there talking about “her kids” I know she adopted the boys, and they seem to love her. But that still rubbed me wrong for some reason. I think it was simply how many times she used the phrase. I think if I were her I’d certainly have suspicions. But love can blind you from things you don’t want to see I guess.

      Anyway, I would have a hard time finding him guilty even though there are things that make it seem likely that he contributed to her death.

      • Smallishtowngirl

        I completely stand by my statement that I did not hear any gossip that her death was nefarious in nature. Tongues wagged about suicide and overdose. I worked in a very busy office at that time and we heard plenty of gossip. I can tell you who in this town is a SOB and he was not on the radar. My only three encounters with him after graduation were odd but not odd enough for me to decide he is a murderer on feeling alone. And i thought he was a terrible school board president and pushed through a new football surface in the name of “safety” in spite of the school needing a safer main entrance that would have benefited all students. So I can’t say i am a big fan.
        And I still dont see how him lying about time of death is proof of murder. Or someone seeing a man pacing in the morning. And I don’t believe pathologists who can look at pictures and make a definitive cause of death.

      • Tara

        I know TT is super busy, but I wonder if there will be a recap of the 48 Hours show.
        I found it interesting that Cory’s mom was the one who who asked for the cremation.

      • quincygirl

        I personally always heard rumors of him doing something to her. I heard poisoning more than anything. Cory’s mother would never ever in an interview say that she thought Curtis was guilty. That is just who she is. Cory’s mother requested the cremation because Cory’s father was in the end stage of cancer (he died 3 weeks later) and it is what they always did in their family anyway. (According to her) I have a family member that works at the SA office and they had plenty to say about Curtis. That is why I knew he was fired and that the courthouse was on lock-down. He threw a fight when his daughter didn’t list him as a parent when she was in a pageant. She only listed her deceased mother and her grandparents. The third wife adopted them 5 months after their marriage and changed the boys’ middle names because they had Cory’s family names originally. I believe they are to call her mom and that was from the get go. Lyndsay was a part of the family when Christine married Christine, but she drifted away again. I believe it was right after the adoption and after she was contacted by the detective. I believe things started to add up for her. I still believe that is why the adoption was rushed through. maybe she came back and told Curt and her grandparents or her brothers that she was visited by a detective. As i said on the other post… Curtis has asked for his transcripts and they said they don’t have money but they have announced they have new counsel.

  19. usmc

    I watched the 48 hours show about this case and thought it was really strange how lovelace current wife kept calling the kids “my children,” “my kids”…to me it was very disrespectful to Cory (mother) and her family since they are her kids…from what I’ve read Curtis and his current wife haven’t really been together that long ..

    • tamaratattles

      I agree, I cringed every time I heard her say that. It didn’t seem very loving.

      BTW I dunno why your comment went into moderation. Things get glitch when the site gets busy.

      • Smallishtowngirl

        The my kids comments didn’t bother me. She has been their mother for 18 months and doing all of the things a mother does.
        The face scrunching and nose wrinkling annoyed me but I am sure that I have some annoying things like that as well so I don’t put much stake in it except that it annoys me.

  20. Terry

    This case is just strange. It has been announced that the Investigating Innocence organization will now be assisting in Lovelace’s defense. That group’s website lists Dr. Michael Baden as the Honorary Chairman of its Forensic Science Advisory Board. Dr. Baden was an expert witness in Lovelace’s first trial–for the prosecution! Eight year old murder cases apparently make strange bedfellows.

Please Read the COMMENTING RULES before commenting.